Blog - January 2017

James Croll Medal winner


The QRA is delighted to announce that, at this year's AGM, the 2016 James Croll Medal was awarded to Professor Ian Shennan (Durham).  The highest award of the QRA, the Croll Medal is normally awarded to a member who has not only made an outstanding contribution to the field of Quaternary science, but whose work has also had a significant international impact.



Ian is the pre-eminent Quaternary sea-level scientist of his generation.  He is internationally recognised for his outstanding contributions to sea-level research over a range of temporal and spatial scales in the UK and abroad, for his rigour and innovation in developing new approaches to observing, reconstructing and modelling sea-level and coastal change, and as an inspirational educator and communicator.  His work is widely cited and addresses topics as diverse as coastal evolution, ice-sheet history, glacio-isostasy, coastal archaeology, storms and tsunamis, land uplift and subsidence and meltwater spikes. 
Ian’s involvement in various IGCP and INQUA projects have been critical in the advancement of sea-level studies in the UK and internationally.  They helped transform it from a largely inductive science, marred by inconsistent methods and approaches that restricted national and international comparisons and synthesis, to a modern discipline founded on a commonly accepted language that now speaks to a diverse range of earth science communities. 

A full citation will appear in a future issue of Quaternary Newsletter.

2017 Honorary Members


Three new Honorary members were nominated and approved unanimously at the Annual General Meeting at Durham in recognition of their outstanding services to Quaternary science. The 2017 Honorary members are Tim AtkinsonMike Hambrey and Mike Tooley. The Association would like to extend its warmest congratulations to these new Honorary members. Full citations will be provided in a forthcoming issue of Quaternary Newsletter.



Tim Atkinson





Mike Hambrey




Mike Tooley



Undergraduate Dissertation Prize winner

The winner of the Undergraduate Dissertation Prize for 2016, announced at the recent AGM in Durham, is Tom Sim (University of Leeds), for his submission entitled The environmental impact of European settlement in Australia: influences on a patterned fen ecosystem. The judges were extremely impressed with the volume of work undertaken, commenting that "the originality of the project and the depth with which the student engaged with the wider literature was near professional in standard. Tom should be extremely proud of his achievement".



Tom Sim (University of Leeds)

The abstract of the winning dissertation will be published in a forthcoming issue of Quaternary Newsletter.  The Association wishes to thank the examiners, Ian Candy and Ian Evans, and to acknowledge the continuing support of Catherine Souch and her team at the RGS for the administration of the prize.

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