Annual Discussion Meeting (ADM)

Annual Discussion Meetings are usually held over 2 to 3 days in early January. They are centred on a key scientific theme and draw national and international interest, with keynote speakers from around the world. In recent years themes have included; The Quaternary of Britain; The Last British Ice Sheet; Isotope and noble gas analysis; The Palaeolithic Occupation of Europe; Land-Ocean Correlation; and Constructing Quaternary Chronologies.

Annual Discussion Meeting (ADM)

Annual Discussion Meetings are usually held over 2 to 3 days in early January. They are centred on a key scientific theme and draw national and international interest, with keynote speakers from around the world. In recent years themes have included; The Quaternary of Britain; The Last British Ice Sheet; Isotope and noble gas analysis; The Palaeolithic Occupation of Europe; Land-Ocean Correlation; and Constructing Quaternary Chronologies.

QRA ADM Chester 2019: Environmental Change: pace, magnitude and impact

University of Chester (main campus)

03/01/19 - 05/01/19

Dr Graham P WILSON

In our 50th anniversary year, our Annual Discussion Meeting will be held in the new venue of the University of Chester.

Quantifying the pace,

magnitude and associated impacts of environmental change are key overarching

themes in Quaternary research. Investigating these central themes...

In our 50th anniversary year, our Annual Discussion Meeting will be held in the new venue of the University of Chester.

Quantifying the pace,

magnitude and associated impacts of environmental change are key overarching

themes in Quaternary research. Investigating these central themes drives our

understanding of system behaviour and interconnectivity, and fundamentally

informs the effective management and stewardship of the natural environment.

Some impressive

advances have been achieved in these themes across the discipline. For example,

our understanding of the magnitude

and regional expression of millennial-scale climate oscillations have improved

as the geographical range and quality of proxy records has grown.

Methodological advances, such as the application of transfer functions

underpinned by extensive contemporary training sets, have permitted magnitudes of change to be more

precisely quantified. Advances in chronology (e.g. Bayesian modeling, exposure

dating) have led to increasingly precise quantification of pace, or rates, of change, for example in ice sheet thinning,

whilst expansion of the tephra database, driven in part by improved detection

of cryptotephras, has facilitated correlation between marine, ice and

terrestrial records, allowing insights into system leads and lags. Detailed

studies at the catchment scale reveal the potential for complex and non-linear impacts on systems as a result of

environmental disturbance, with implications for effective management. Indeed,

identifying the onset of profound and pervasive human impacts on the functioning of the Earth system is currently at the

forefront of the discipline, with widespread debate surrounding the recognition

and definition of the ‘Anthropocene’.  Finally,

a stronger framework for gaining a better

understanding of future system behaviour is developing through advances in

computing capacity and increasingly refined numerical models, validated by the

ever more precise, well dated and highly resolved palaeorecord.

 Proposed

thematic sessions

Adoption of the overarching

theme of ‘Pace, Magnitude and Impact

of environmental change by the ADM will serve to disseminate some key advances

in these areas amongst the diverse Quaternary science community. Specific

thematic sessions will focus on (i) terrestrial depositional records (e.g.

lake, peat, speleothem, polar ice), (ii)

marine depositional records (deep ocean, continental shelf and marginal

marine), (iii) geomorphic records

(glacial, fluvial, coastal) and (iv)

record integration and system simulation. Such a framework will provide an opportunity

to discuss emerging challenges and a platform to encourage cross-disciplinary interaction

and integration.

 The University of

Chester will serve as an excellent new

venue for the ADM. Established in 1839, it is one of the oldest higher

education institutions in the country. The main campus is 15 minutes walk from

the centre of Chester. The city of Chester was founded as a Roman fortress in 1st

Century AD. It is one of the best preserved walled cities in Britain and noted

for its rich archaeological and architectural heritage. Chester is linked

directly to the national motorway network, and has fast rail links to London

and major UK cities.

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