Annual Discussion Meeting (ADM)

Annual Discussion Meetings are usually held over 2 to 3 days in early January. They are centred on a key scientific theme and draw national and international interest, with keynote speakers from around the world. In recent years themes have included; The Quaternary of Britain; The Last British Ice Sheet; Isotope and noble gas analysis; The Palaeolithic Occupation of Europe; Land-Ocean Correlation; and Constructing Quaternary Chronologies.

Annual Discussion Meeting (ADM)

Annual Discussion Meetings are usually held over 2 to 3 days in early January. They are centred on a key scientific theme and draw national and international interest, with keynote speakers from around the world. In recent years themes have included; The Quaternary of Britain; The Last British Ice Sheet; Isotope and noble gas analysis; The Palaeolithic Occupation of Europe; Land-Ocean Correlation; and Constructing Quaternary Chronologies.

QRA ADM 2019, Chester: Environmental Change: pace, magnitude and impact

University of Chester (main campus)

03/01/19 - 05/01/19

Dr Graham P WILSON

more information

Event organisers and contact details


Graham Wilson (graham.wilson@chester.ac.uk);

Katharine Welsh (k.welsh@chester.ac.uk);

Amanda Williams; Dale Tromans; Philip...

Event organisers and contact details


Graham Wilson (graham.wilson@chester.ac.uk);

Katharine Welsh (k.welsh@chester.ac.uk);

Amanda Williams; Dale Tromans; Philip Marren.

The 2019 ADM coincides with the 50th Anniversary of the formal adoption of the name ‘Quaternary Research Association’ at the 1969 AGM in Aberystwyth. Professor Frank Oldfield (University of Liverpool and former QRA President) will mark the occasion with a specially-invited talk.

Scientific Themes

  • Rates of change (e.g climate, sea-level, ecosystem, sediment flux)
  • Impacts of change (climate, anthropogenic) at various spatial scales, specifically system response to change
  • Record correlation to establish leads and lags across a range of temporal scales
  • Methodological advances in quantifying rates and magnitudes of environmental change

We invite contributions which detail the latest research into the pace, magnitude and impact of Quaternary environmental change as recorded in terrestrial and marine depositional sequences and in geomorphic records. We also invite contributions which focus on record integration and system simulation. This may include work which combines sources of evidence (e.g. documentary, archaeological), particularly in relation to human impacts and debates surrounding the concept of an ‘Anthropocene’, as well as the development and application of computer models (e.g. climate, catchment, GIA) and statistical models.

The 2019 Annual Discussion Meeting at Chester aims to provide a platform to encourage cross-disciplinary interaction and integration, as well as opportunity to discuss emerging challenges and to keep abreast of developments in different parts of the discipline.

Keynote and specially invited speakers 

Dr Niamh Cahill (University College Dublin); Professor John Dearing (University of Southampton); Professor Phil Hughes (University of Manchester); Professor Christine Lane (University of Cambridge); Professor Gina Moseley (University of Innsbruck); Professor Frank Oldfield (University of Liverpool); Professor Maria Fernanda Sanchez-Goñi (EPHE, PSL; Université de Bordeaux) and Dr Rachel Smedley (University of Liverpool).

Conference payment and abstract submission deadlines

  • Monday 19th November 2018 (midnight): Abstract deadline.
  • Wednesday 28th November 2018 (midnight): QRA member Early Bird / Unwaged and student registration and payment deadline.
  • Monday 3rd December 2018 (midnight): Final registration and payment deadline, including for the optional Conference Dinner and on-site accommodation. 

Conference fees and options


Lunch and refreshments are provided.

Quaternary Research Association member price list

Please ensure that you include your membership number where requested.

  • Early Bird full conference*: £150
  • Standard full conference: £190
  • Student / unwaged full conference*: £100
  • Early Bird day-rate*: £85
  • Standard day-rate: £105
  • Student / unwaged day-rate*: £60

* QRA member Early Bird & student / unwaged deadline: 28/11/18 (midnight).

Non-member price list

  • Standard full conference: £230
  • Student / unwaged full conference: £120
  • Standard day-rate: £125
  • Student / unwaged day-rate: £70

Final payment deadline (including for the optional conference dinner and on-site accommodation): 03/11/18 (midnight).

Accommodation fees and options

On-site accommodation in Astbury House (http://www.chester.ac.uk/node/23183) is available for Thursday 3rd and Friday 4th January. The cost of the en-suite accommodation, including breakfast, is £30 per night. Alternatively, delegates may choose to stay in Chester city centre (15-20 minute walk) where there is a wide range of accommodation options (please see https://www.visitcheshire.com/chester).

Conference dinner

The 2019 QRA ADM Conference Dinner will take place on the evening of Friday 4th January at Chester Cathedral. The cost of the dinner will be £38 per person. This includes a wine reception, a choice of a two-course menu with table wine and water, and a set desert. Additional alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages will be available for purchase (cash bar).

Fees, booking and Abstract Submission


Please see the Chester 2019 QRA ADM website:

https://www1.chester.ac.uk/departments/geography-and-international-development/about-us/events

Programme Preview


Thursday

3rd January 2019, 11.45 am start (coffee from 11.15am)

Session A Terrestrial Depositional Sequences

KEYNOTE: Christine Lane (University of Cambridge): Volcanic Chronologies and Tephra Connections in East Africa

Lauren Davies (University of Alberta): When multiple chronometers don’t agree: independent verification of Arctic age-models using cryptotephra isochrons with implications for sediment accumulation, a case study from Cascade Lake, northern Brooks Range, Alaska

Graham Wilson (University of Chester) Persistent millennial-scale climate oscillations in Southern Europe during the Penultimate Glacial

Joanne Egan (Edge Hill University): Postglacial diatom-climate responses in a small lake in the Pacific Northwest of North America

Mick Frogley (University of Sussex): Mid- to Late Holocene lacustrine response to millennial-scale climate forcing in the southern Peruvian Andes

Will Fletcher (University of Manchester): Impacts of snow melt on alpine ecology in the Marrakech High Atlas during the last 500 years

Matthew Jones (University of Nottingham): Local to global proxy system models of lake d18O variability

Meighan Boyd (Royal Holloway University of London): Climate changes during the Last Glacial recorded in a new speleothem isotope record from Gibraltar

INVITED: Gina Mosely (University of Innsbruck): Cryogenic cave calcites in Britain: a spatial framework for dating the demise of permafrost during the last glacial cycle

QRA ADM and Medal Ceremony

Poster Session & Wine Reception

 

Friday 4th January 2019, 9 am start

Session B Marine and Nearshore Depositional Sequences

KEYNOTE: Maria Fernanda Sanchez Goñi (EPHE, PSL University): Air-sea-ice interactions at orbital and millennial timescales: the puzzle of the Ice Ages

Mark Hardiman (University of Portsmouth): Tephrochronology as a stratigraphic tool for the Middle Pleistocene of Northern Europe: a new distal volcanic ash record from the North Atlantic (ODP-980)

Mark Coughlan (University College Dublin): Palaeoenvironmental change in the Western Irish Sea Mud Belt

Chris Fogwill (University of Keele): Title TBC 1010-1030

Mark Bateman (University of Sheffield): Understanding the depositional record of the Storegga Tsunami

Graham Rush (University of York): Rapid sea-level rise and climate change: lessons from the Early Holocene

Timothy Shaw (Nanyang Technological University): Drivers of relative sea-level changes in the Chesapeake Bay, U.S. Atlantic coast over the past 4000 years

Geoff Richards (University of York): Exploiting new Holocene sea-level archives to inform future sea-level predictions: an example from Wales

Martina Conti (University of York): Organic geochemical markers of sea-level changes

INVITED: Niamh Cahill (University College Dublin): A Bayesian statistical model for reconstructing and analysing former sea levels


Session C Geomorphic Records

KEYNOTE: Phil Hughes (University of Manchester): Quaternary glaciations in the Mediterranean mountains: extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance

Ben Davenward: Determining the presence, extent and landsystems context of ground ice within glacial environments, a multi-disciplinary approach

Stephen Davison (CGG Services (Robertson) Ltd): Low temperature quartz overgrowths in Quaternary glacigenic sediments: an example from North Wales

Clare Boston (University of Portsmouth): The sedimentary architecture and morphology of the Brampton kame belt

Becky Briant (Birkbeck, University of London): Identifying sea level highstands from slowly uplifting coastlines: lessons from a complex last interglacial (MIS 5e) highstand on the South Coast of England

Trevor Faulkner (University of Birmingham): Why there are probably caves beneath the Norwegian Sea

Geoff Duller (University of Aberystwyth):  Rocks as clocks: luminescence dating of cobbles to constrain retreat of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet

INVITED: Rachel Smedley (University of Liverpool): Title TBC

 

CONFERENCE DINNER: CHESTER CATHEDRAL 1930 - LATE

Saturday 5th January, 9am start

Session D: Record Integration and System Simulation

KEYNOTE: John Dearing (University of Southampton): Palaeoenvironmental records and modern social-ecological systems

Helen Roberts (University of Aberystwyth): Generating long chronologies for lacustrine sediments in eastern Africa using luminescence dating: implications for understanding environmental change and human dispersal

Jonathan Dean (University of Hull): A 650 kyr hydroclimate record from Chew Bahir, southern Ethiopia, and implications for Anatomically Modern Human dispersal out of Africa

Abi Stone (University of Manchester): Reconstructing the palaeoenvironment of Wadi Dabsa, southwest Saudi Arabia, using tufa carbonate, and implications for the Palaeolithic archaeological record

Madeleine Moyle (University of Liverpool): From monitoring to the palaeo-record: long-term perspectives on the phosphorus status of the Shropshire Meres

Richard Chiverrell (University of Liverpool): Using lake sediment archives to improve understanding of flood magnitude and frequency: recent extreme flooding in northwest UK

Michael Walker (Trinity Saint David, University of Wales, Lampeter, and Aberystyth University): Formal subdivision of the Holocene Series/Epoch (extended talk)

Mark Maslin (University College London): Farewell Holocene. Welcome to the Anthropocene.  (extended talk)

Jan Zalasiewicz et al (University of Leicester): The Anthropocene as a potential new unit of the Geological Time Scale. Oral delivered by Frank Oldfield (University of Liverpool).

INVITED: Frank Oldfield (University of Liverpool): A Dinosaur Reflects (extended talk)

Discussion and Closing Remarks 1430-1500


We hope to see you in Chester!

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